the power of curiosity

Never underestimate the power of giving students autonomy.

As regular readers (both of you :-)) will know, I have no time for practical work where students already know the expected result.

The obvious and easiest improvement is to “flip” the practical, so that the students are puzzled/intrigued/surprised by the result and have to interpret the results for themselves, or at the very least are forced to ask the question “why?” so that the theory you then teach is in response to their curiosity.

But far better still is giving students the opportunity to ask their own questions, so that they have complete control, complete autonomy.

Take my Year 9s.

We had zoomed through Enzymes and Digestion so quickly that I was suddenly faced with the prospect of starting Plant Transport in February. I don’t know if you’ve ever tried to get potometers working in February, but it’s a pretty joyless and pointless exercise.

So I thought I’d use the time to introduce some Micro-biology and let them carry out some investigations. But it’s not on the spec.! bleat the bucket filling information shovellers.

Perhaps not. But leaving aside other considerations – such as motivation, excitement, interest – it’s a great way of putting their experimental design skills into another context.

So, lesson 1, a quick intro to aseptic technique and agar plates, followed by a little mini-project – how does bacterial load on finger tips vary with stage of washing? This takes a double lesson, as they need to be clear about various points, and I want them to do it properly, all ready to look at for the following lesson. I also want them to think about Controls and Measurements. Not only are there lots of good ideas and intelligent suggestions here, but they are also already wanting to introduce their own variations (can they use hand gel? can they compare air dried with towel dried? and so on). It’s a great illustration of what can happen when you encourage curiosity and independence.

Once all the plates are in the incubator, each one carefully divided up into Unwashed (Control), Wet, Soapy, Rinsed, Dried sections, I explain that they now have the necessary skills/techniques to ask their own question. What could they use these techniques to find out?

Next lesson, they get to look at their incubated plates, and, as generally happens, they see that washing your hands appears to have very little, if any, effect on the number of bacteria they transfer to the plate! The results actually weren’t all that spectacular, with very little bacterial variation, but they’re still fascinated by what they can see, and keen to plan their own projects.

Here’s some examples of what they went for:

  • testing the 5 second rule
  • comparing the hygiene of different year groups by sampling the surfaces of locker handles for bacterial load
  • investigating bacterial biodiversity in different habitats
  • investigating the efficacy of different anti-bacterial agents
  • investigating the bacterial load of different food preparation surfaces

and a few others that I can’t immediately recall.

Actually, the questions are irrelevant – what was so wonderful was how motivated and interested and excited they were at being allowed to do whatever they liked. They will have complete ownership, from beginning to end, and their results will be their results – a real taste of the thrill of doing original research.

A very happy end to the week. I’ll let you know how they get on…

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